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Ferrari 250 GT Pininfarina 3.0 Litre 12-Cylinder no. 1147GT 1959

General description : 1959 Ferrari 250 GT Series I Pinin Farina Coupe
s/n 1147GT, Engine no. 1147 (internal no. 0218D)
Grigio Scuro with Black Interior

Introduced in 1958, the 250GT Pininfarina Coupe represented Ferrari’s shift toward standardized production road cars, both to showcase the technology tested in racing, and to provide consistent income to support racing. The cars were elegant, understated, and luxurious, and were available as both open and closed variants. Fitted with the venerable 3-litre V-12, the 250 GT is in many ways the quintessential classic Ferrari, and with generous space for both passengers and luggage, PFs have always been excellent touring cars.

This particular car’s history is well known, thanks to a comprehensive summary by Ferrari historian Marcel Massini:

October 24, 1958:
Chassis frame sent to Carrozzeria Pinin Farina in Torino

February 12, 1959:
Rear axle assembly completed by mechanic Walter Sghedoni, supervised by foreman Amos Franchini

February 14, 1959:
Gearbox assembly completed by mechanic Beltrami, supervised by foreman Amos Franchini

February 14, 1959:
Engine assembly completed by mechanics Zanasi and Fossati, supervised by foreman Amos Franchini

February 16, 1959:
Engine dyno tested by mechanic Pinelli, supervised by engineer Russo

February 17, 1959:
Chassis frame completion date on factory build sheets, signed by foreman Amos Franchini

1959:
Delivered to official Ferrari importer Italauto SA of Lausanne, Switzerland, a company owner and managed by race driver and Baron Emmanuel “Toulo” De Graffenried of Switzerland

1959:
Sold by Italauto SA to first owner Guinness, resident in Switzerland. As a Series I car, equipped with drum brakes, an offset shifter, and finished in grigio scuro with beige leather interior. Likely equipped with a Series II discs brake assembly early in s/n 1147GT’s existence, possibly at Ferrari, as the entire system including the rare proportioning valve is identical to that of a Series II.

By late 1977:
Exported to the USA and owned by James B. Wise of Oklahoma City, OK.

By 1980:
Owned by Merle H. Mickley Mishne of Cleveland, OH

By late 1999:
Sold to Brian De Vries of Grand Rapids, MI

June 2000:
Sold to Walter Giovanelli, Hauppauge, NY

By 2002:
Sold to Simon De Giula Botta, Oakland, CA

By 2003:
Sold to the current owner

Recently the car has seen considerable restoration work, both cosmetic and mechanical. This work included an engine rebuild by Patrick Ottis & Co. which included a new water pump, and a rebuilt starter, and generator. Once completed, the engine was dyno-tested to confirm 212 horsepower and 194 ft/lbs of torque. A new clutch and flywheel were installed as the engine was re-installed. A comprehensive brake system overhaul was also performed, as was a repaint in the original and striking shade of grigio scuro. Many other smaller works were carried out to ensure the car is in fully operable trim mechanically, and this is confirmed by its excellent road manners.

The car employs a driver level cosmetic presentation. The recent repaint is in good order, but not done to show standards. It would likely polish up a bit with a careful but comprehensive color sand. The brightwork is straight, generally complete, and free of major pitting, but with hazing and some light weathering present. The glass and lenses show some age in select areas, primarily the windscreen, which has some wiper marks. The car sits on Borrani RW 3598 5.5x400 wire wheels, which are shod with newer Michelin 185 X Series tires.

The interior, which appears to have been partially reupholstered in 2000, also employs a nice driver presentation. There are no tears or holes in the leather, although there is some drying evident on the dash pad and center console. The carpets are older, but in serviceable order. The gauges are all present and appear to be operational, although some of the under dash switchgear may not be totally original. The headliner is in very good shape. The trunk is upholstered, but generally unrestored in its presentation.

The engine bay is partially restored, primarily the engine itself, which is quite correct in its details, and makes a fresh presentation. The inner fenderwells, and some of the ancillary components have an unrestored presentation. The equipment present is quite correct, including the brake booster, remote oil filter housing, air cleaner and related wing nuts, yellow fuel lines, horns and compressor, and the fuse panel.

The underside of the car is generally solid, but in unrestored condition. There are some areas of perforation in splash areas behind the wheels.

The car runs and drives well. The engine starts easily and pulls strong making good power over a wide RPM range, with virtually no smoke. Acceleration is brisk, thanks in part to its low final drive ratio. The transmission shifts smoothly, with good synchros, both when warm and cold. The disc brakes are effective, pulling the car down straight, which is not always the case with drum brake fitted cars. The suspension is generally in good order, although there is some noise present at back when going over rough road surfaces, likely related to the level-style rear shock absorbers.

Offered with a Marcel Massini report, a copy of the build sheets, records supporting the restoration works, a second set of keys, and a very smart modern production tool roll with select original tools, this Series I PF Coupe will appeal to the Ferrari enthusiast who recognizes the value of the two passenger 250 Series cars, but is not looking to spend upwards of $1,000,000 USD. With the engine completed, the heavy lifting is done, making this car an ideal example which could be taken to the “next level” by its next custodian. s/n 1147GT is a rational purchase for the investment-minded owner looking for a car where they can benefit financially from a sweat equity labor of love, or alternatively, it could be enjoyed with a clear conscious, exactly as it is now.

1959 Ferrari 250 GT Pininfarina 3.0 Litre 12-Cylinder no. 1147GT is listed For sale on ClassicDigest in California by Fantasy Junction FOR $625000.

 

Car Facts

Car type : Car Make : Ferrari Model : 250 GT Pininfarina Model Version : 3.0 Litre 12-Cylinder no. 1147GT Engine size : 3.0 Model Year : 1959 Location : Emeryville Vehicle Registration : Undefined

625000 $

Seller Information

Fantasy Junction
Fantasy Junction
+1 510 653 7555

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About Ferrari
The first Ferrari road car was the 125 S introduced in 1947 and powered by a 1.5 L V12 engine, right?
Well it's not quite that simple, Ferrari did in fact produce e Tipo 815, in 1940. Tipo 815 was designed by ex-Alfa Romeo engineers Alberto Massimino and Vittorio Bellentani and by Enrico Nardi under Enzo's company but legal issues with the former associate Alfa Romeo prevented Ferrari from launching the Ferrari marque at that point.

Enzo did produce a series of fine road cars in the 50's and 60's but they were merely to finance his true passion racing, wheather GT/Sports car or Grand Prix. The 50's saw the birth of Ferrari's most memorable cars, 250 GTB (tour de France) 250 Testa Rossa, 250 GT swb just to name a few.

Under the surface tension was growing though. In November 1961 long-time sales manager Girolamo Gardini made an ultimatum to Enzo: if tensions continued, he would leave the company. As a result, Gardini was ousted, as well as Scuderia Ferrari manager Romolo Tavoni, chief engineer Carlo Chiti, experimental sports car development chief Giotto Bizzarrini, and a number of others who stood by them.
Without Chiti and Bizzarrini the development of what was to become the most quintessential Ferrari and today the world's most expensive car, 250 GTO, was at a pivoting point. 250 GTO project was saved by a young engineer Mauro Forghieri and long-time racing bodyman Sergio Scaglietti who stepped in and took over the program with known results.

In addition to 250 GTO, Ferrari launced such master pieces as 250 LM, 250P, 275 GTB, 365 GTB/4 "Daytona" during the the 60's
By the late 60's Ferrari's prototypes' success came to a sudden halt by a new competitor, GT40. Ford turned to Lola to produce a Ferrari beating long distance racer after Enzo had cut the deal off with Henry Ford II making the latter absolutely boil with fury. The collaboration between Ford and Lola created the mighty Ford GT40 that gave Ferrari some heavy hits in Le Mans 24 to come.
By the end of the 60's FIAT purchased 50% of the company, starting a development that has led to a new mass-produced era of Ferraris.

Whether you are selling or looking for a classic Ferrari www.classicdigest.com is the place to check out.