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Ford Hi Boy Roadster 302 V8 1932

General description : Description
One glance at this 1932 Ford Highboy Roadster and you can instantly tell it is a full custom build. In fact, as you dig into the details, you are going to find features that you may never thought of adding but are absolutely awesome on a hot rod (like the Harley-Davidson headlights.) It all makes for a V8 street machine that ensures people will remember it long after you leave the stoplight.
This is a steel bodied Ford roadster, but the bold paint laid on top is pure Mopar awesome. The Plum Crazy is a High Impact color that's on the best Hemi muscle cars, and so it instantly identifies this as a speedy custom. The build was a three-year, $85k labor of love, and it was completed less than 500 miles ago. So the metal looks terrific and the paint has a deep luster. This has a lot of the classic features you love on a hot rod, like the waterfall grille, custom pinstriping, and the smooth fender-free body. And this is integrated with some cool distinct touches, like rounded low-cut windshield and rear lights integrated into the chrome bumper. And the smaller Harley-Davidson headlights make the grille look taller so that this Highboy looks even higher. This idea of classic and custom really seems to come together nicely on true knock-off Dayton wire wheels done in a gloss black.
A roadster like this was meant to be open to the world, and so you get a great-looking interior. The metal tub bucket seats have the classic/simple style that you're supposed to have in a speed machine like this, but the padded inserts with leather upholstery signal the build is first-class. It's clean and complete, right down to rumble seat style trunk. This is a driver-focused environment with a wood and chrome sports steering wheel, Lokar shifter, and a dash dominated by clean and crisp Equus gauges.
The engine bay may have a smooth purple firewall, but it has proper blue oval power in the middle. The bright Ford Racing valve covers are a dead giveaway that you have a well-built 302 cubic-inch V8. It includes a Holley four-barrel carburetor, upgraded intake, and a hot cam. Plus, there are the right supporting components, like an HEI ignition and an aluminum radiator w/electric fan. And for those few people who don't take note of the zoomie-style exhaust headers, the growl will certainly grab their attention. As you look over the whole build, you'll spot a strong custom chassis that's color-matched in purple so you can put a mirror under this one at the car shows. You can even see pinstriping on the rear diff cover! There's also the three-speed automatic transmission, four-link rear with adjustable coilovers, and four-wheel disc brakes.
Clean, custom, and absolutely awesome, you need to get your hands on this fresh build. Call today!!!

Features : Four Wheel Disc Brakes , Coil-Over Suspension , Leather Seats ,

1932 Ford Hi Boy Roadster 302 V8 is listed for sale on ClassicDigest in Dallas / Fort Worth, Texas by Streetside Classics - Dallas/Fort Worth for $45995.

 

Car Facts

Car type : Car Make : Ford Model : Hi Boy Model Version : Roadster 302 V8 Engine size : 0.0 Model Year : 1932 Sub type : Convertible Location : Dallas/Fort Worth Vehicle Registration : Undefined

45995 $

Seller Information

Streetside Classics - Dallas/Fort Worth

Streetside Classics - Dallas/Fort Worth
(817) 764-8000
Contact Seller

ClassicDigest Market Radar on Ford Hi Boy

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About Ford
Ford, founded in 1902, has arguably changed the history of automotive world more than any other car manufacturer by introducing the first people's car Model T in 1908. They had produced more than 15 million cars by the end of the production in 1927, by which T had become obsolete.

Ford launched the first low priced V8 engine powered car in 1932. 1932 V8 was an instant hit with superior handling and performance to many far more expansive cars of the day. No wonder 32 V8 Ford has become such a favourite among hot rodders around the world with 32 Deuce coupe as their icon.

During the war Ford completely shut down civilian vehicle production to dedicate all its resources to the Allied war efforts (1942-45) They used to build B-24 bombers, aircraft engines, jeeps, M-4 tanks, military trucks and Bren-gun carriers and more than 30,000 super-charged Rolls Royce Merlin V-12 engines for Mosquito and Lancaster bombers as well as P-51 Mustang fighters. After the war Ford cars in the USA got bigger and flashier along with their competitors. In the 60's Ford was back in the forefront again when introducing their commercial hit Mustang in 1964. Mustang was so popular the competition had to follow Ford's example and the ponycar phenomenon took over the US. Over the years the ponies grew some muscles until the oil crisis kill finally killed them off.

In the sixties Ford rushed into international motor sports scene with a fury. After unsuccessful Ferrari takeover, when Enzo Ferrari had cut the deal off with Henry Ford II making the latter absolutely boil with fury, Ford turned to Lola in UK to produce a Ferrari beating long distance racer after. The collaboration between Ford and Lola created the mighty Ford GT40 that absolutely beat Ferrari in Le Mans 24 numerous times.

In Europe, Ford introduced some of the most epic race and rally cars of the 60's based on humble family sedans; Cortina GT, Lotus Cortina, Escort Twin Cam, and Escort 1600RS with the iconic Cosworth BDA engines.

Today classic Fords are extremely popular with enthusiasts and a great selection of classic Fords can be found for sale at www.ClassicDigest.com